Keynote Speakers Keele 2010

Keynote speakers Keele 2010 included

Professor Vicki Bruce OBE (Newcastle University).

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www.ncl.ac.uk/psychology/staff/profile/vicki.bruce

Professor Bruce is a former President of the BPS and her main research area is visual cognition, in particular face recognition. She will give the opening lecture of the conference at lunchtime on Friday 2nd July.

After graduating with a BA (Natural Sciences) and PhD (Psychology) from Cambridge she was appointed to a lectureship in 1978 at the University of Nottingham and was promoted Reader in 1988 and Professor in 1990. In 1992 she moved to Stirling, where she was Deputy Principal from 1995 until 2002.  She was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1996, Honorary Fellow of the British Psychological Society (BPS) in 1997, and Fellow of the British Academy in 1999. She was awarded the OBE for services to Psychology in 1997, and in that year was awarded the BPS Presidents’ Award for distinguished contributions to psychology. In 2000 she was co-winner of the BPS Cognitive Psychology award with Mike Burton (Glasgow) and Peter Hancock (Stirling).

In 2001 she was awarded the BPS Book award with Andy Young (York), for their 1998 book, published by Oxford University Press, “In the eye of the beholder: The science of face perception”, written to accompany a successful exhibition in Edinburgh at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery. Her research has been supported by some 30 grants totalling c. £2 million from research councils and other bodies, and has resulted in five authored/co-authored books (one in 4 editions), six edited/co-edited books, over 100 refereed journal articles and many chapters and other forms of dissemination. She is currently a member of the Northern Ireland Higher Education Council and the Broadcasting Council for Scotland. She was President of the British Psychological Society during its Centenary year in 2001.

Professor David Wilson (Birmingham Central University)

Prof David Wilson
www.lhds.bcu.ac.uk/criminaljustice/davidwilson

David Wilson followed a successful career as a Prison Governor at a variety of prisons including HMPS Wormwood Scrubs and Grendon and HMP Woodhill – where he designed and managed the two units for the 12 most disruptive prisoners in the country.

Latterly he was Head of Prison Officer and Operational Training in the Prison Service – on whose behalf he made official visits to Northern Ireland and the USA, and on behalf of the Council of Europe to Albania, prior to joining the University.

He has published widely on the CJS generally and prisons specifically, and is the Editor of The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice. He appears regularly on the TV and radio both as a commentator about the Criminal Justice Service (CJS) and as a presenter.

David’s interests range from practical interventions in current debates in criminal justice policy and practice, to more academic considerations of portrayals prisons and prisoners in literature. He has recently completed an assessment of Charles Dicken’s reportage of prisons, to be published as ‘Testing a Civilisation – Charles Dickens on the American Penitentiary System’ in Essays in Honour of Professor W R Brock (forthcoming).

Publications include

David Wilson (with Keith Soothill) (2005), ‘Theorising the Puzzle that is Harold Shipman’ Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, December 2005; 16(4); pp 685-698

David Wilson (2005), ‘The Cinematic Appeal of the Prison’, in Clive Emsley (2005) The Persistant Prison: Problems, Images and Alternatives, pp 74-90, Francis Boutle London.

David Wilson (2005) Death at the Hands of the State, Howard League for Penal Reform.

David Wilson (2004), ‘The Politics and Processes of Criminal Justice’, in Cavendish Handbook of Criminology and Criminal Justice, pp 21-35, Cavendish Publish

Professor Michael Murray

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http://www.keele.ac.uk/depts/ps/people/MMurray/index.htm

Originally from Belfast, Michael Murray obtained a BSc Psychology from the University of Ulster followed by a PhD in Social/Health Psychology from the University of Stirling. He then held appointments at St. Thomas’ Hospital Medical School (now part of King’s College, London), the University of Ulster and Memorial University in Canada before joining Keele in 2006.

Michael is the Associate Editor of the Journal of Health Psychology and sits on the Editorial Boards of several other journals including Psychology, Health & Medicine, Subjectivity and Arts & Health. He was a founding member of the International Society of Critical Health Psychology and is a Chartered Health Psychologist.

Research and Scholarship

He is currently working on several large research projects including:

Social engagement among older people project.   http://www.keele.ac.uk/research/lcs/csg/callme/ This project is funded by the New Dynamics of Ageing Initiative and is concerned with exploring strategies for enhancing social engagement among older people who live in disadvantaged communities.

Theatre, memory, ageing and locality: a study of the changing role of theatre in representing and constructing ageing. This is a study exploring the role of the theatre in representing and constructing ageing in society.

Dr Irenka Suto (Cambridge Assessment)

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Irenka Suto studied at Cambridge University, obtaining a BA in Natural Sciences and a PhD in Psychology. She stayed on to conduct post-doctoral research in the Department of Psychiatry, publishing a book and numerous journal articles on financial decision-making and the assessment of mental capacity among people with intellectual disabilities.

In 2004, Irenka joined the Research Division at Cambridge Assessment, where she is a Senior Research Officer. Cambridge Assessment is a department of Cambridge University and the parent organisation of the OCR awarding body. Irenka’s current research explores the many human judgements and decisions entailed in educational assessment, as made by students, teachers and examiners. She has published and presented widely in the field, and is interested in the diversity of research methods that can be used to improve the validity and reliability of examinations.