Breakout Events Descriptions

Breakout Events Descriptions

Please note the numbers on the left correspond to the session number on the breakout programme.

1       Extended writing for Psychology

Deb Gajic, The Polesworth School

Deb is head of Psychology at The Polesworth School (an ‘outstanding’ school, where Deb is an ‘outstanding teacher’!) and a Chartered Psychologist. She has been a member of the ATP committee for many years and her latest role is Treasurer, previously having held the posts of Magazine Editor and Chair. She is passionate about teaching and regularly runs training workshops for teachers of Psychology, recently for Keynote Educational, the Higher Education Academy and Resourcd.

Deb Gajic, The Polesworth School

Deb is head of Psychology at The Polesworth School (an ‘outstanding’ school, where Deb is an ‘outstanding teacher’!) and a Chartered Psychologist. She has been a member of the ATP committee for many years and her latest role is Treasurer, previously having held the posts of Magazine Editor and Chair. She is passionate about teaching and regularly runs training workshops for teachers of Psychology, recently for Keynote Educational, the Higher Education Academy and Resourcd.

 

This workshop will focus on extended writing.  We will look at strategies to enable your students to reach their full potential in these difficult skills.  Specifically: –

 

  1. AO1, AO2 and AO3
  2. Strategies for improving evaluation
  3. 12, 16 and 20 mark essays
  4. 8 mark answers
  5. Extended writing in research methods
  6. Assessment

 

The focus will be on active teaching of extended writing skills   You will be given innovative and active ideas for delivering these skills to students effectively. We will discuss how to make the learning ‘stick’ and strategies for making the content accessible to lower ability students and stretch and challenge for the more able will also be discussed.  We will also look at the assessment requirements of this skill and how to ensure students can access top grades. Upgrade your lessons from ‘good’ to ‘outstanding’!

2      A broken windows theory of teaching psychology

Andrew (Jock) McGinty, Watford Grammar School for Boys

This session will take a lighthearted look at Wilson and Kelling’s Broken Windows Theory to find ways that ensure disorderly learning does not affect our students’ understanding of psychology. Are we Kelly and what can we do to make sure our regulars work as effectively as possible to understand psychology?  Is zero tolerance the answer or what about defensible space and who are our students’ Guardian Angels? We will discuss the extra steps we take in order to make our classrooms places where our students do not commit ‘crimes against psychology’.

 

3     Intervention Strategies in Psychology

Deb Gajic, The Polesworth School

Intervention seems to be the latest buzz word in education.  How can we ensure all our students make progress and achieve their full potential in Psychology?  This workshop will discuss some of the strategies that I use in my classroom, including Directed Improvement and Intervention Time (DIRT), assessment ACTION points and using Personalised Learning Checklists (PLCs) to track progress.

There will be plenty of opportunities to share good practice.

4       Researching the psychology classroom

Dr Julie Hulme, Keele University

In this session, Julie will get you thinking about how you can apply psychological research methods to finding out what works in your psychology classroom. She will share some of her own recent projects, and will start you thinking about how you can design, implement and publish your work, as well as using it to benefit your teaching and get your students involved in real research.

5    GCSE Introduction to the new specification

AQA Karen Boswell

We’ll look at the new specification focusing on the new content and the way it will be assessed. There will be guidance on changes in methods of assessment and some ideas for teaching. You will have the chance to explore the resources available and ask any questions.

6      OCR A Level Psychology – Core studies

OCR Andrew McGinty

In this workshop Jock will focus on different ways to teach the Core Studies component and how to get your students to see the bigger picture and link them to the themes, areas perspectives and debates. For research methods we will look at ways to teach inferential statistics and for the Applied component 3 we will specifically focus on teaching evaluation skills so that your students can effectively analyse research and create arguments that show higher order evaluation.

7     Teachers’ support networks – Setting them up and joining them

Kevin Silber, Senior Lecturer in Psychology, University of Derby

As the member of the ATP committee who has responsibility for facilitating psychology teachers’ support networks (PTSNs), I am running this workshop to help those interested in setting up or participating in a local network. More than 20 years ago our Chair, Helene Ansell, set up the Staffordshire PTSN. As a member of that group, I realised how group meetings facilitated a sharing of resources, ideas, experiences and support. This is valuable to all psychology teachers and is especially useful for those who are isolated teachers in a school or college and/or who’s degree may not be in psychology. When I moved to Derby I set up a Derbyshire PTSN and this has now been running for 3 years. We meet once a term at various school, college and university locations, discuss issues and share resources. As an HE member of the group, I have been able to help build strong relationships and support between secondary and tertiary environments, including student conferences, university visits, and so on.

 

 

 

8     The neuromyth of learning styles…and other stories

Dr Julie Hulme, Keele University

In this session, Julie will challenge the educational theory of learning styles, and introduce you to some alternative ways of thinking about student learning. You’ll have the opportunity to try out some different psychometrics (and take them away with you), and think about how you can best support all of your students to reach their potential.

9     Character Education and Development

Dr Charles Margerison, Viewpoint Resources Ltd and Amazing People Institute

‘Schools are expected to help students not only pass examinations but develop as well rounded individuals.

We want both Curriculum and Character Development.’

 

This session will provide examples and case studies from various schools in the U.K., Australia, and the USA of how schools are pursuing the above objectives. In particular, it will provide an opportunity for discussion and debate on the role psychologists in the process.

10              Do methods drive you mad! Do stats get you in a state?

Hugh Coolican, author & Mandy Wood, Portsmouth Grammar School

The ATP welcomes the legend that is Hugh Coolican to Keele 2017 for a joint workshop with Mandy Wood. In these heady times, as fake news abounds, Hugh and Mandy challenge you to identify the fact from fiction with regard to some of the most misused concepts in sixth form psychology. Furthermore, are you able to fathom which tests should be used and when?! We’ll supply you oodles of flagrantly fraudulent data and get you selecting, justifying, running and reporting on the correct tests in order to guide your students to statistical success. We’ll also give you some top tips on using the BPS research digest to stretch your G and T pupils and get them creating sets of stats questions of their own..

11    AQA Psychology made simple

Cara Flanagan, Southwest Conferences, author

Cara Flanagan shares some top tips for making the new A level course simple yet successful. We’ll look at the key things to target to improve grades and leave yourself time to enjoy the course more (and do all those practicals).

12   A-Level Mathematical content

AQA Sue Standring

We’ll be exploring ways to help students acquire the mathematical skills that now constitutes a critical 10% of their overall grade. There will be discussions on how these skills will be assessed and also strategies will be explored that may improve student performance.

13   Teaching research methods in a practical way

WJEC/Eduqas Dr Rachel Dodge/Louise Steans

This session focuses on practical techniques that can be used in the classroom to enhance research methods teaching. The session is non-board specific and will cover maths skills and other elements of research methods that students find more challenging, such as research design, levels of data and statistical testing. There will be a number of resources provided to delegates, who will be encouraged to share ideas and think about research methods teaching in new ways.

14   GCSE – getting to grips with Pearson Edexcel Psychology

Edexcel Dawn Collis

The new GCSE specifications are due to start this coming autumn term. Learn more about the Pearson Edexcel specification and why it may be the option for you. The only specification that gives you the choice of option topics in a specification more constrained by government regulation than ever before.

15   Introducing the new OCR GCSE 9-1 Psychology Specification!

OCR Kirsty Bingham

If you’re a GCSE teacher, you’ll definitely want to come and learn more about the new GCSE specification from OCR.  This is an opportunity to find out what has and hasn’t changed, what exciting new content has been added including a focus on mental health which OCR have developed in partnership with Time to Change, and an overview of the assessment structure.

16    A day in the life of an Occupational Psychologist – lessons on promoting mental health and wellbeing in organisations

Dr Myanna Duncan C.Psychol. Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London

In this session, Dr Myanna Duncan will outline her career path as an Occupational Psychologist. She will draw on her experience working as a Chartered Occupational Psychologist in industry and discuss some of her work as Lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King’s College London. The session will particularly focus on her experience of promoting mental health and welllbeing in organisational settings. Dr Duncan will draw on examples from her work with healthcare professionals and explore implications for educational contexts.  The session will include a Q&A component.

17   Embedding Mindfulness into lessons

Harriet Ennis, Bootham School, York

This is a practical session in which you will learn, first-hand, how to introduce and embed Mindfulness practices into your Psychology lessons (and/or your own life), whilst teaching some tricky research methods content, relevant to all the Psychology specifications, at the same time. This session will introduce a useful skill for you and your students to learn, to cope with stress. The techniques can be used as a practical session/s to literally ‘spice up’ BioPsychology, linked to Neuro-plasticity (in AQA and OCR), Positive Psychology (in WJEC and Eduqas) and/or Brain localisation and Neuro-imaging topics (in AQA and Edexcel/Pearsons).

18    The psychology of advertising: overt persuasion and covert influence

Dr Martin Rowley, Keele University

The topic of advertising provides a useful opportunity to illustrate to students the relevance of psychology in understanding important aspects of our everyday environment and how we respond to them. In this session we will briefly take a look at how fundamental psychological theories have traditionally been used to explain the processes involved in advertising. We will also look at how recent ideas in psychology have transformed our view of how modern day advertising actually works and highlight some of the ethical questions this raises

 

 

 

 

19   A-Level Issues and Debates

AQA Dr Tracey Elder

In this session, we will be exploring how students can meet the question requirements and assessment objectives in their answers and how they should use their knowledge and understanding of topics studied elsewhere in the specification using sample student responses. We will also look at implications for teaching and learning and how best to maximise students’ performance.

20   A level – core studies

OCR Andrew McGinty

In this workshop Jock will focus on different ways to teach the Core Studies component and how to get your students to see the bigger picture and link them to the themes, areas perspectives and debates. For research methods we will look at ways to teach inferential statistics and for the Applied component 3 we will specifically focus on teaching evaluation skills so that your students can effectively analyse research and create arguments that show higher order evaluation.

21    How to get the best out of your Students for Edexcel Psychology – maximise potential & get students to target the AOs

Edexcel Dawn Collis

Getting the ‘basic’ marks on a response is relatively straightforward for students who know the material and how to apply it. Getting the extra marks that make the difference at the top end of the mark range is much harder. Explore strategies for maximising your students’ chances of gaining those marks

22   20+ ideas in one hour? Start the clock…

Amanda Clark, Andover College

Details: At these workshops I love walking away with practical, entertaining and effective ideas that I can use in my classroom. I have a variety of memory aids, real life examples, resources and practicals that help students to engage with the lesson and get a clearer appreciation of psychology. Come to this session if you want to walk away with at least 20 new ideas that you could use in your classroom. Bring a memory stick and you can have a copy of all the resources, my treat!

23  Fun animal studies relevant to the new specifications

Evie Bentley, ASAB

Animal behaviour appears throughout psychology. Come and get practical ideas, engaging activities, even worksheets and a bit of awe and wonder for your lessons

24  Pimp your Psychology VLE

Matt Jarvis, Author

Virtual Learning Environments are omnipresent but often dull and out of step with the online platforms students use in other contexts. This often results in poor levels of student usage. However, just as a PowerPoint doesn’t have to mean endless bullet points of detail, a VLE doesn’t have to be just a repository for your handouts and presentations. The aim of this session is to show ways to embed exciting psychology-specific tools into a course VLE page, including tweets from psychologists you are teaching about, online statistical analysis, psychology search tools, theory and study evaluation tools and psychology careers tools. We will also look at more generic tools for AfL, embedded learning and flipped learning and ways to make your basic resources look slicker.

 

 

25   Psychological literacy and language

Punam Farmah, OnCampus/CEG Ltd

Psychology as a science is a discipline with a rich and vibrant vocabulary. Vocabulary that is very much western and orientated towards an individualistic culture. Imagine therefore, if your first language is not English, and Psychology as a discipline does not translate well to your cultural group. This workshop aims to bring together lessons learned in working with international students and apply them to teaching Psychology as a lingua franca that further promotes psychological literacy. There will be exploration of Psychology as an additional language and how language and literacy in the classroom can be used to support and scaffold progress and achievement.

26   Ecotherapy and ecopychology – healing the mind and helping the planet

Dr John Hegarty, Chartered Psychologist and Senior Lecturer in Psychology, Keele University

Ecopsychology studies people’s relationship to nature. It is a branch of environmental psychology that includes a radical element (psychologists should aim to conserve, reduce pollution and so on) and is keen on ecotherapy (using nature for health and wellbeing).

 

Key underpinning concepts are that of “biophilia” (the idea that we are instinctively predisposed to be interested in natural things), and “nature connectedness” which has been extensively researched.

 

“Green care” (or ecotherapy)  is a modern movement, which encompasses a wide range of approaches including care farming, animal assisted activities, walking for health programmes and community farm ownership.

 

This workshop introduces some of the key ideas, including John Hegarty’s own research and development work on care farming. The workshop is activity-based, with opportunities to try out a number of simple exercises aimed at promoting mindfulness and nature-connection.

27    GCSE Introduction to the new specification

AQA Karen Boswell

We’ll look at the new specification focusing on the new content and the way it will be assessed. There will be guidance on changes in methods of assessment and some ideas for teaching. You will have the chance to explore the resources available and ask any questions.

28   Teaching research methods in a practical way

WJEC/Eduqas, Dr Rachel Dodge/Louise Steans

This session focuses on practical techniques that can be used in the classroom to enhance research methods teaching. The session is non-board specific and will cover maths skills and other elements of research methods that students find more challenging, such as research design, levels of data and statistical testing. There will be a number of resources provided to delegates, who will be encouraged to share ideas and think about research methods teaching in new ways.

29    The Year in Neuroscience: A review of Recent Developments

Dr Guy Sutton, Director, Medical Biology Interactive & Honorary (Consultant) Assistant Professor, University of Nottingham School of Medicine

In this lecture, I will explore some of the recent findings from neuroscience. Examples of areas to be covered include a consideration of developments in understanding of brain networks and the human connectome, neuroimaging and the use of functional brain imaging, the neurobiology of consciousness,  brain changes in schizophrenia and neurodegenerative illnesses, and, of course, an update on developments in neurobionics.

30    Applying memorisation techniques in the classroom

 James Paterson – British Memory Champion & Head of Psychology at LVS Ascot

With examinations moving to linear programmes, students’ memories will be tested more than ever before. In this session you will discover how memory techniques work, how to use them yourself through interactive demonstrations and how students can use them as part of a wider study strategy.  Specific examples will be included showing how students of A-Level Psychology have used these techniques which has helped to reduce the stress and anxiety that is typically associated with examinations.

31   Do methods drive you mad! Do stats get you in a state?

 Hugh Coolican, author & Mandy Wood, Portsmouth Grammar School

The ATP welcomes the legend that is Hugh Coolican to Keele 2017 for a joint workshop with Mandy Wood. In these heady times, as fake news abounds, Hugh and Mandy challenge you to identify the fact from fiction with regard to some of the most misused concepts in sixth form psychology. Furthermore, are you able to fathom which tests should be used and when?! We’ll supply you oodles of flagrantly fraudulent data and get you selecting, justifying, running and reporting on the correct tests in order to guide your students to statistical success. We’ll also give you some top tips on using the BPS research digest to stretch your G and T pupils and get them creating sets of stats questions of their own.

32   Extended writing for Psychology

Deb Gajic, The Polesworth School

This workshop will focus on extended writing.  We will look at strategies to enable your students to reach their full potential in these difficult skills.  Specifically: –

  1. AO1, AO2 and AO3
  2. Strategies for improving evaluation
  3. 12, 16 and 20 mark essays
  4. 8 mark answers
  5. Extended writing in research methods
  6. Assessment

 

The focus will be on active teaching of extended writing skills   You will be given innovative and active ideas for delivering these skills to students effectively. We will discuss how to make the learning ‘stick’ and strategies for making the content accessible to lower ability students and stretch and challenge for the more able will also be discussed.  We will also look at the assessment requirements of this skill and how to ensure students can access top grades. Upgrade your lessons from ‘good’ to ‘outstanding’!

33  Calm Your Mind

 Rachel Moody, King Edward VI School, Southampton

An experiential taster session of mindfulness techniques you can use for your own benefit, or with groups of students – Psychology Society, tutor group, even as a lesson starter or end. I will also explain some of the neuroscience evidence for the effectiveness of mindfulness practice. This session may involve music, nature, breathing, cuddly toys and colouring.

34   A-Level Mathematical content

AQA Sue Standring

We’ll be exploring ways to help students acquire the mathematical skills that now constitutes a critical 10% of their overall grade. There will be discussions on how these skills will be assessed and also strategies will be explored that may improve student performance.

35  Theories and Studies for the new Specification: (Which ones and how much detail is necessary

Edexcel Dawn Collis

Within the A/AS level specification from Pearson Edexcel there is a degree of choice on the studies and theories that can be covered. We will look at some of the options available and consider reasons for opting for particular choices within the specification, as well as pointers for making the best decisions for you and your students.

36   OCR A Level – exam requirements

OCR Andrew McGinty

This workshop will deal with the exam requirements for each component and how to access marks in exams. We will focus on the demands of research design and response for the Research Methods component and areas, perspectives and debates for the Core Studies paper. We will also discuss how to tackle the application questions in component 2. For component 3 the Applied component we will focus on how to show evaluation skills for the Options and the Mental Health topic.

37   Researching the psychology classroom

Dr Julie Hulme, Keele University

In this session, Julie will get you thinking about how you can apply psychological research methods to finding out what works in your psychology classroom. She will share some of her own recent projects, and will start you thinking about how you can design, implement and publish your work, as well as using it to benefit your teaching and get your students involved in real research.

 

 

 

 

38    Title: Making Research Methods and Statistics fun and accessible. DART-P sponsored workshop

Division of Academics, Researchers and Teachers: DART-P (BPS) Victoria Bourne, Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway

Research Methods and Statistics can be a very challenging area to teach, particularly as students often view it as difficult, boring and irrelevant. This workshop will focus on how to teach Research Methods and Statistics in a fun and accessible way, focusing on two particularly difficult areas of the curriculum: Reliability and Validity, and Basic Statistics. Examples will be given of teaching techniques and materials which allow students to engage in practical exercises that echo what researchers actually do when conducting a piece of research. By grounding the learning in interactive and applied exercises students can more easily see the value of the taught content, and by engaging them in practical exercises the content becomes far less intimidating. An example of how to teach Reliability and Validity through the practical exercise of designing and evaluating a questionnaire will be discussed, and then Basic Statistics will be covered to consider how we might want to analyse the data collected in the questionnaire. Examples of teaching materials and exercises will be provided during the session.

39   The psychodynamic approach in depth – strengths and limitations

Emilia Raczkowska (Freud Museum)

Drawing on recent developments in the fields of psychotherapy and neuroscience, this session will address some of the common misconceptions about the psychodynamic approach and discuss its scientific status.

40   Fibromyalgia and depression: A case study of psychological assessment, evaluation and treatment according to cognitive behavioural therapy

Dr George Varvatsoulis, CPsychol, CBT Practioner, CSct Expert Witness

The client came for treatment suffering from the long-term condition (LTC) of fibromyalgia which decreased her self-esteem, introduced to her depressive thinking and emotions, lack of concentration during her everyday activities, and lack of socialisation and communication with others. During the first three sessions, we discussed her cognitive and behavioural ABC (antecedent-behaviour-consequence) models, so to understand her problem, look at the goals she would like to achieve and present interventions which would cover all three domains of cognition, feelings and behaviour, so that the client to learn how to change what she believed about herself as well as to activate herself behaviourally in order to become proactive and committed to her chosen new changes

41   A-Level Issues and Debates

AQA Dr Tracey Elder

In this session, we will be exploring how students can meet the question requirements and assessment objectives in their answers and how they should use their knowledge and understanding of topics studied elsewhere in the specification using sample student responses. We will also look at implications for teaching and learning and how best to maximise students’ performance.

42  Here To Maturity: Inside The Teenage Brain

Dr Guy Sutton, Director, Medical Biology Interactive & Honorary (Consultant) Assistant Professor, University of Nottingham School of Medicine

“If you have a son who does nothing good… deliver him at once into the hands of a merchant who will send him to another country… Nothing else can be done. While he remains with you, he will not mend his ways.” So wrote Florentine merchant Paolo of Certaldo in the 14th century. Teenagers have long frustrated adults with apparent black and white thinking, egocentric thoughts, irrational behaviour and focus on the present. But can raging hormones account for such behaviour and is the teenage brain really an immature structure? In this lecture we will explore some truths and myths regarding the adolescent brain, considering brain development and changes from childhood to adolescent to adulthood. We will examine the effects of alcohol, nicotine and cannabis on the teen brain, together with teenage mental health issues. We will conclude by offering a defence of the adolescent brain!

43   I think I can, I think I can: Researching and teaching growth mindsets

Dr Yvonne Skipper, Keele University

Carol Dweck’s concept of mindsets has become increasingly popular and is having a growing impact on educational practice internationally. According to Dweck’s theory, people hold either a ‘fixed mindset’ believing that intelligence is a fixed trait which cannot be changed, or a ‘growth mindset’, believing that intelligence is malleable and can be improved with effort.  This area of research has recently become part of some GCSE level psychology specifications.

There is a wealth of research exploring the impact of mindsets on learners and also on the impact of mindset interventions.  In this interactive workshop we will cover recent research into this area as well as exploring effective teaching of these concepts.

44   Student emotional well-being. How can we help? Who can we help?

Wendy Doyle, Psychology teacher and researcher

A student wellbeing app (SWSA) is in the process of being developed and trialled. Students rate their levels of confidence on a number of subjects as well as provide ratings on a number of personal issues e.g. Personal energy, optimism, friendships, self confidence …. they simply download and swipe and each time they do this they can compare their current score with their aggregate score. They are given a gentle nudge to speak to someone if aggregates start going into the red zone. The SWSA has the potential to function as an early intervention tool to prevent escalations in anxiety. It is fully inclusive and provides students with a voice giving them autonomy over their own wellbeing.

 

This session provides you with the opportunity to try out the app for yourself and provide vital feedback on its design and usefulness.

 

45   Participatory learning of Research Methods and Statistics

Rachel Moody, King Edward VI School, Southampton

Students learn research methods better when they apply their theoretical knowledge to practical research. Some teachers take this a step further and teach statistical testing in the context of student-led research. I will spill all the gory details of how this went for me and my students, and share some resources which I have developed to go alongside my chapters in the dog books. Laminated freebies may be available if I have nothing better to do in June.

46 Teaching research methods in a practical way

WJEC/Eduqas, Dr Rachel Dodge/Louise Steans

This session focuses on practical techniques that can be used in the classroom to enhance research methods teaching. The session is non-board specific and will cover maths skills and other elements of research methods that students find more challenging, such as research design, levels of data and statistical testing. There will be a number of resources provided to delegates, who will be encouraged to share ideas and think about research methods teaching in new ways.

47 Mental Health and in the classroom: Supporting students

Punam Farmah, OnCampus/CEG Ltd

One in four people will experience a mental health concern. Now imagine that is one in four of your students. That would equate to a good proportion of your classes, and would impact upon both teaching and learning. The aim of this workshop is to consider some of the mental health concerns-both major and minor-that would influence the workings of our classrooms. There is an opportunity to consider some of the person-centred listening skills that could be used to support students and how we can work towards reducing the stigma attached to mental health concerns.

48   20+ ideas in one hour? Start the clock…

Amanda Clark, Andover College

Details: At these workshops I love walking away with practical, entertaining and effective ideas that I can use in my classroom. I have a variety of memory aids, real life examples, resources and practicals that help students to engage with the lesson and get a clearer appreciation of psychology. Come to this session if you want to walk away with at least 20 new ideas that you could use in your classroom. Bring a memory stick and you can have a copy of all the resources, my treat!

49   Fancy writing something? 

Cara Flanagan, Southwest Conferences, author (and friends)

This is a session for any of you who fancy making a fortune writing textbooks. Actually there are no fortunes to be made but many people are nevertheless keen to have a go. Come along and hear various authors and publishers talk about what they do and how they got into it. Give us your contact details and we may be in touch.

 

 

50   Intervention Strategies in Psychology 

Deb Gajic, The Polesworth School

Intervention seems to be the latest buzz word in education.  How can we ensure all our students make progress and achieve their full potential in Psychology?  This workshop will discuss some of the strategies that I use in my classroom, including Directed Improvement and Intervention Time (DIRT), assessment ACTION points and using Personalised Learning Checklists (PLCs) to track progress.

There will be plenty of opportunities to share good practice.