Breakout Events Descriptions 2015

by Jamie on June 19, 2015

Please note the numbers on the left correspond to the session number on the breakout programme.

1       Mathematical requirements in the New Specifications for September 2015

Deb Gajic, The Polesworth School

Deb is head of Psychology at The Polesworth School (an ‘outstanding’ school, where Deb is an ‘outstanding teacher’!) and a Chartered Psychologist. She has been a member of the ATP committee for many years and her latest role is Treasurer, previously having held the posts of Magazine Editor and Chair. She is passionate about teaching and regularly runs training workshops for teachers of Psychology, recently for Keynote Educational and the Higher Education Academy.

 

Within the new 2015 A level Psychology specifications 10% of the marks available will be for assessment of mathematics (in the context of psychology) at a Level 2 standard or higher. Lower level mathematics may still be assessed, but will not count towards the 10%. This new requirement is a concern for many teachers; either because they are worried about how to support lower level students or not confident about their own subject knowledge in this area. This workshop aims to demystify maths, change negative mindsets and provide practical and fun ways to teach this in the context of Psychology.

2     Using Character strengths in the psychology classroom

Andrew (Jock) McGinty, Watford Grammar School for Boys

In this workshop, Jock will provide a background to positive psychology and which character strengths can be best used and developed to support your teaching and student learning.

3     Teaching Research Methods: Legacy and new specifications: Calculating Chi Square & Standard Deviation. Please bring a calculator

Andy McCarthy CPsychol. Member of the Royal Statistical Society (RSS)

Christ Church University and amac-education

Suitable for experienced teachers, teachers new to psychology and teachers worried about new specification changes (Sept 2015).

Content is suitable for all examination boards and IB

For many students, research methods was the well concealed ‘time bomb’ which exploded at degree level. The new specifications, have to some extent addressed this and future A-Level psychology students; will find the transition much smoother.

 

I hope to inspire you with some new approaches and to make teaching and learning in this area more enjoyable for both you and your students. Hand-outs and copies of the research methods workbook will be made available after conference.

 

 

 

 

4      Dirty, sticky curriculum planning

Clare Deavall, Cannock Chase High School

The session aims to give ideas about how to plan a curriculum from spec to exam taking into account how to make learning stick. It will use concepts such as spiral learning and DIRT to ensure that students are consolidating learning and making excellent progress within lessons and across time. Applicable for all specs and particularly useful for teachers who are less experienced at planning curriculum or planning to swap specifications.

5   ‘Margaret Floy Washburn is one of the Best’

Elin Angharad (Psychology Subject Officer EDUQAS/WJEC)

To provide support to those about to start teaching the new 2015 specifications in terms of advice on making choices about content to teach

6      Research Methods

Andy Gilbert, subject officer OCR

This session will support teachers in the delivery of the new content for research methods, including how to approach practical activities and quantitative skills requirements. The workshop will enable delegates to discuss the assessment of this unit, view support materials and carry out curriculum planning.

 

7     Delivering the deliver the new AS and A levels in Psychology

Christine Solari-Brain (Johnson) (Pearson/Edexcel)

Description: The session will look at:

  • the structure, content and assessment of these new qualifications, and the support available to guide you through these changes
  • possible teaching and delivery strategies for the new qualifications, including co-teaching AS and A level
  • Topics 1 to 4 in detail with an overview of Topics 5 to 9
8    Getting ready to teach the new AQA AS and A level Psychology

Dave Berry, AQA

Make planning for the new AQA AS and A-level Psychology simpler. Whether you are an experienced teacher, non-subject specialist or a newly qualified teacher, come along to this workshop to learn how to how to get the most out of the support and resources we have available to plan engaging lessons.

9    Visual Illusions in Real and Virtual Environments

Dr Sally Linkenauger, Lancaster University

In this workshop, through interactive demos, we will experience illusions which highlight reveal how visual perception systems work. These experiences will take place in the real world and in virtual reality.

10              Feedback to the Future: The Psychology Behind Effective Feedback Delivery

Dr Yvonne Skipper, Keele University

Feedback is one of the ‘top ten’ influences in learning (Hattie, 2009). Additionally, OFSTED now require that in order to achieve an ‘Outstanding level’, feedback should be high-quality so that pupils know how to progress (Secondary Education Guide to What Makes an Outstanding Lesson, 2013). However, these abstract concepts are often difficult to understand in concrete terms and changes in feedback delivery are often not based on research evidence and not evaluated rigorously.

This workshop aims to provide an overview of the current psychological research around effective feedback delivery to provide a framework for sharing current practices to better understand how we can all improve our feedback delivery to enhance students’ motivation and learning.

11   GCSE Psychology: Engaging learners and raising standards

Helen Kitching, AFBPsS, CPsychol, MSc, QTLS

Join me for some fun and engaging lesson ideas for GCSE psychology. Feel free to share your ideas too. We will also consider how to help students achieve the best grades possible.

 

Helen has taught psychology at GCSE level for 17 years and recently wrote a teachers’ guide for an new iGCSE Psychology course for the Egyptian state education system.

12   Sharing Support: Getting Ready for the new OCR Spec (Sponsored by OCR)

Mark Souter, OCR

There is an increasing number of teacher resources on the OCR web site, but some people (me!) think you can’t have too many when a new spec is due. The aim of this session is to “implement tasks in a distributed process of parallel creativity” … (put that in a report to your manager) it’s really just a straightforward division of labour to share out the burden and save us simultaneously reinventing the wheel: the session will introduce three main learning and teaching elements, and look for volunteers to create one each of the following for each new study in the spec, plus the new methodological elements, core studies in their pairs and how they link to key themes and areas: (1) A set of Quizlet flash-cards of key concepts; (2) A PowerPoint of the main teaching points; (3) A set of exam-like questions

How many each person takes on will be a function of a quantitative factor: the number of volunteers and the qualitative factor of individual enthusiasm! Emails will be shared, and the whole lot will be shared via Resourc’d

13   Delivering the new AS and A levels in Psychology: Sponsored by Pearson (repeat)

Christine Solari-Brain, Pearson

Description: The session will look at:

  • the structure, content and assessment of these new qualifications, and the support available to guide you through these changes
  • possible teaching and delivery strategies for the new qualifications, including co-teaching AS and A level
  • Topics 1 to 4 in detail with an overview of Topics 5 to 9
14   Using AQA AS & A level resources to inspire learning

Dave Berry, AQA

This training session will give you invaluable information on the new streamlined content and assessment materials. We’ll also give you guidance on teaching methods including how to get the most out of our schemes of work so that you are ready to teach the AQA AS and A-level Psychology from September. We’ll talk you through using our teaching resources to create lessons that will inspire the psychologist in your students.

15   Getting into Publishing

The authors – Oxford University Press

Have you always wanted to know more about working with a publisher? Do you often wish you could write and publish your own work? Come along to the OUP workshop and meet the in-house editorial team, and best-selling authors Cara Flanagan, Matt Jarvis and Julia Russell – pick up some tips of the trade and take the opportunity to input your ideas into new resources! This workshop is facilitated by Oxford University Press.

16   Enhancing memory: The role of narratives in recall

Dr Alan Collins, Lancaster University

In this workshop we will undertake a version of an experiment that I have run successfully with second year undergraduates for the last 3-4 years. It is based on a research article from 2010 that has since provoked considerable debate. The workshop will involve participating in the study, looking at the outcome, and thinking about its strengths and weaknesses both as a study and as a teaching exercise. In broad outline, the experiment is based around how encoding items in relation to a scenario can have an effect on recall and what those effects tell us about the nature of human memory. Although the full study may be a little advanced for many A-level students, it should be possible to revise it to make it more accessible

17   The extended Essay and the AO’s.

Helene Ansell, Chair ATP

This workshop will look at the new assessment criteria of AO1/Ao2/Ao3 as they appear in the new specifications. We will discuss the differences between them and to try to gain a better understanding of the AO’s criteria. In addition we will spend time looking at tips for students on extended writing as all three papers now have some element of extended writing within them.

18    Dirty, sticky curriculum planning (repeat)

Clare Deavall, Cannock Chase High School

The session aims to give ideas about how to plan a curriculum from spec to exam taking into account how to make learning stick. It will use concepts such as spiral learning and DIRT to ensure that students are consolidating learning and making excellent progress within lessons and across time. Applicable for all specs and particularly useful for teachers who are less experienced at planning curriculum or planning to swap specifications.

19   ‘Margaret Floy Washburn is one of the Best’ (repeat)

Elin Angharad (Psychology Subject Officer EDUQAS/WJEC)

To provide support to those about to start teaching the new 2015 specifications in terms of advice on making choices about content to teach

20   Research methods (repeat)

Andy Gilbert, subject officer OCR

This session will support teachers in the delivery of the new content for research methods, including how to approach practical activities and quantitative skills requirements. The workshop will enable delegates to discuss the assessment of this unit, view support materials and carry out curriculum planning.

21   Delivering the new AS and A levels in Psychology (repeat)

Christine Solari-Brain, Pearson

Description: The session will look at:

  • the structure, content and assessment of these new qualifications, and the support available to guide you through these changes
  • possible teaching and delivery strategies for the new qualifications, including co-teaching AS and A level
  • Topics 1 to 4 in detail with an overview of Topics 5 to 9

 

 

22   Getting ready to teach the new AQA AS and A level Psychology (repeat)

Karen Duffy, AQA

Make planning for the new AQA AS and A-level Psychology simpler. Whether you are an experienced teacher, non-subject specialist or a newly qualified teacher, come along to this workshop to learn how to how to get the most out of the support and resources we have available to plan engaging lessons.

23 Writing essays at A2

Jock McGinty, Watford Grammar School for Boys

This workshop will focus on the requirements of essay writing at A2 across all exam boards and how best to develop evaluation skills with your students.

24   From Big Bang to Zombie Apocalypse: The Next Generation

Matt Jarvis, author

Popular culture is a great tool for communicating with young people. The aim of this presentation is to show examples of how to use music, film and TV to illustrate psychological theory and research. This is an updated version of the seminar presented at the Aston University conference. As well as updated examples this time I will present a little theoretical background. Expect Big Bang Theory, Finding Nemo and Zombies… Lots of zombies.

25   Contacts, collaboration and concord…

(European Federation of Psychology Teachers’ Associations)

Hannele Puolakka (EFPTA President), Dorothy Coombs (ATP rep)

Come along to meet the new President of the European Federation of Psychology Teachers’ Associations, Hannele Puolakka, and find out what your colleagues across Europe have been getting up to. Our latest research was presented as a poster at the International Congress of Psychological Science in Amsterdam in March.

You will be able to pick up some tips for collaborating with teachers and students in joint research activities like the “Sleep Project”, make some useful contacts and find out about the next EFPTA conference to be held in Prague next April.

26   Teaching Research Methods: Legacy and new specifications: Calculating Chi Square & Standard Deviation. Please bring a calculator (repeat)

Andy McCarthy, CPsychol. Member of the Royal Statistical Society (RSS)

Christ Church University and amac-education

Suitable for experienced teachers, teachers new to psychology and teachers worried about new specification changes (Sept 2015).

Content is suitable for all examination boards and IB

For many students, research methods was the well concealed ‘time bomb’ which exploded at degree level. The new specifications, have to some extent addressed this and future A-Level psychology students; will find the transition much smoother.

 

I hope to inspire you with some new approaches and to make teaching and learning in this area more enjoyable for both you and your students. Hand-outs and copies of the research methods workbook will be made available after conference.

 

 

 

27   Positive Psychology: the Big Sister of positive thinking

Eduqas/WJEC

An exploration of how this newest approach in psychology is far more than the simplistic notion of ‘positive thinking’ to improve emotions

28   Sharing Support: Getting Ready for the new OCR Spec

Mark Souter, OCR

There is an increasing number of teacher resources on the OCR web site, but some people (me!) think you can’t have too many when a new spec is due. The aim of this session is to “implement tasks in a distributed process of parallel creativity” … (put that in a report to your manager) it’s really just a straightforward division of labour to share out the burden and save us simultaneously reinventing the wheel: the session will introduce three main learning and teaching elements, and look for volunteers to create one each of the following for each new study in the spec, plus the new methodological elements, core studies in their pairs and how they link to key themes and areas: (1) A set of Quizlet flash-cards of key concepts; (2) A PowerPoint of the main teaching points; (3) A set of exam-like questions

How many each person takes on will be a function of a quantitative factor: the number of volunteers and the qualitative factor of individual enthusiasm! Emails will be shared, and the whole lot will be shared via Resourc’d

29   Using AQA AS & A level resources to inspire learning (repeat)

Karen Duffy, AQA

This training session will give you invaluable information on the new streamlined content and assessment materials. We’ll also give you guidance on teaching methods including how to get the most out of our schemes of work so that you are ready to teach the AQA AS and A-level Psychology from September. We’ll talk you through using our teaching resources to create lessons that will inspire the psychologist in your students.

30   Neuroscience 2014-2015: The Year In Review

Dr Guy Sutton, Director, Medical Biology Interactive & Honorary (Consultant) Assistant Professor, in the Division of Psychiatry at University of Nottingham.

This lecture will explore some of the developments in brain research over the past year, considering advances in connectomics, epigenetics and learning, psychotherapy and the brain, the therapeutic effects of brain stimulation, and near-death brain states and experiences. We will also examine research linking musical ability and executive function, along with findings from a very interesting study investigating myths regarding neuroscience and education. We love brains!

31   New Specifications for September 2015 – Approaching new style exam questions

Deb Gajic, The Polesworth School

Deb is head of Psychology at The Polesworth School (an ‘outstanding’ school, where Deb is an ‘outstanding teacher’!) and a Chartered Psychologist. She has been a member of the ATP committee for many years and her latest role is Treasurer, previously having held the posts of Magazine Editor and Chair. She is passionate about teaching and regularly runs training workshops for teachers of Psychology, recently for Keynote Educational and the Higher Education Academy.

 

This workshop will focus on the new Specifications for teaching September 2015. In particular it will focus on the demands of teaching students how to approach the new style questions common to all awarding bodies (multiple choice and application of knowledge to novel situations etc.). The final half of this session will involve delegates in group discussions about the particular specification that they intend to teach. It aims to be a collaborative session with lots of good practice being shared. Whilst Deb does not profess to know all the answers, she will liaise with subject officers and share your concerns worries with them and, of course, get back to you with their responses.

32   The new maths skills and research methods requirements

Cara Flanagan, Southwest Conferences

This session will aim to put your minds at rest about what the new specifications require – it really is not so very different from before but the concepts do require fine-tuning in order to understand the nuances: What is the difference between an extraneous and a confounding variable? Natural versus a quasi-experiment? Decimal places and significant figures? This theoretically-oriented session will be applicable to all specifications.

33   MSc in Teaching Psychology: an online course from Glyndwr University

Julia Russell /Fiona Lintern

Looking for some decent CPD you can do in your own time? Had enough of school-based INSET peddling psychobabble in the classroom? Want to gain a recognised qualification that isn’t deathly boring? Come and find out about Glyndwr University’s MSc course in the Teaching of Psychology – a chance to speak to students and staff.

34   OCR Component 3 Applied psychology – Issues in mental health and Applied Psychology options.

Jock McGinty

This workshop will look at the background, key research and how it’s applied to a novel situation. Jock will also address the methodological issues and debates that run throughout Applied Psychology.

35   Delivering the new AS and A levels in Psychology (repeat)

Christine Solari-Brain, Pearson

Description: The session will look at:

  • the structure, content and assessment of these new qualifications, and the support available to guide you through these changes
  • possible teaching and delivery strategies for the new qualifications, including co-teaching AS and A level
  • Topics 1 to 4 in detail with an overview of Topics 5 to 9
36   Differentiation: 10 practical strategies

Emma Shakespeare, The McAuley Catholic High School

Differentiation- review of the different methods that can be used to ensure all learners are challenged and supported. The session will provide 10 practical strategies that can be easily implemented into new specification schemes of work.

 

 

37   Contextualise CBT skills within case conceptualisation, formulation and session management”

George Varvatsoulias, CPsychol, CBT Practitioner CSct Expert Witness

Conceptualisation or case formulation according to the CBT perspective is the method through which both the client and the practitioner come to the realisation of the client’s condition and state following assessment of client’s case. In this workshop, there will be outlined the elements included in case conceptualisation; the steps forwarding case formulation within the session; the explanation and exploration of goals and interventions needed according to the client’s understanding of oneself after cognitive and behavioural ABC models have been presented and discussed. In this way, clients become aware of the context and content of own cases and how information received and elaborated can help them conceptualising the kind of changes needed to be addressed in all three domains of cognitions, emotions and behaviours.

38   Have a break…

Anna Horwitz, Norton College

There are 3 things I know about life: students (and teachers) love chocolate, students need help remembering concepts and chocolate makes most things better. A light-hearted, interactive session where we will look at using what I’ve called ‘confectionary –based teaching’. This is using chocolate / sweets / other snacks to illustrate psychological concepts. You may have heard of or used skittles to illustrate sampling techniques; we will go a step further to see what other concepts can be taught using tasty treats. It may seem like a gimmick but the students really do remember the concepts better (and get a treat at the same time).

Warning!! – chocolate and other calorific snacks may be consumed during the session!

 

Feel free to bring your favourite confectionary product with you (if you have any allergies and want to attend then please feel free to bring snacks that you can eat)

39   Students’ practical research in psychology: treading a fine ethical      line

Morag Williamson, MSc, FHEA

Morag has taught psychology for many years, in schools, colleges and higher education in both England and Scotland. She is a former Principal Assessor for SQA Higher, and a psychology textbook author.

 

New specifications are introducing new requirements for student practical work, both north and south of the border. Whatever the course – A-level, SQA Higher, IB – ethical practice is as imperative in student work as it is in academic / professional research, and the ATP’s recently-published ethical guidelines are intended to support teachers and students in this respect. But sometimes it seems that all the really fascinating psychological questions – obedience, altruism, sexual behaviour, psychological disorder etc. – cannot be studied because the methods would be ethically unacceptable. ‘Rules’ for students seem to be even tighter than for professional research – why? Are ethical guidelines too strict? Why is it that reality TV programme makers can manipulate people and situations in ways that are off-limits for researchers? Is it possible to provide our students with practical projects which are interesting and exciting, yet still ethical? In this discussion-based workshop we will consider key issues and share our experiences, our concerns and our ideas, to help us tread this fine line.

40  Making ICT shoulder the burden!

Mark Souter, Clacton Coastal Academy

Teachers are busy, there – I’ve said it, revealing a terrible secret! This session offers some ways in which you can use ICT with minimal set-up. It can set and track work (automatically creating evidence to fend off teacher-botherers); create paper starter activities at the click of a mouse; and offer students the chance to carry out independent study (safe in the knowledge that you will not have wasted too much time if some of the little dears do not take advantage of your efforts!)

1) Google Classroom – Differentiated classroom study – whole spec coverage: Overview: a suite of study activities where students provide answers to questions in a rising sequence of challenges; model answers are already stored and can be pasted in to provide more or less instant feedback for faster-paced students. They can follow up any differences between their answer and the models, but the teacher’s load is light (because initial feedback is pre-prepared) so s/he is free to work with the struggling students.

2) Socrative for independent study with automated feedback

Students need to be aware of their ability, and the evidence is that rapid feedback is highly effective in supporting progress. Socrative was used to set up a substantial bank of short exam questions with mark scheme responses for student self-evaluations. These can be carried out in-class, or set up to run between lessons.

3) Quizlets – learning core concepts; exploiting the spacing effect

Ever since Ebbinghaus put memory research on the scientific map, evidence has accumulated about this phenomenon, yet it is rarely applied systematically at A Level. Quizlets is a ‘flash card’ system with “85 million study sets” covering many subjects, and it is very easy to create new ones. These can be used interactively on line; it creates off-line flash cards and multiple choice tests (hand for starters), and there is a free Android/iPhone app which can store cards for off-line practice.

 

Summary of advantages:

Highly structured learning process

Reduced set-up time for teacher

Emphasis on independent study

Differentiation embedded in the process

Work available to students from any browser

41 The extended Essay and the AO’s.

Helene Ansell, Chair ATP

This workshop will look at the new assessment criteria of AO1/Ao2/Ao3 as they appear in the new specifications. We will discuss the differences between them and to try to gain a better understanding of the AO’s criteria. In addition we will spend time looking at tips for students on extended writing as all three papers now have some element of extended writing within them.

42   Ninja cats, Pirates and Zombies: lessons learned from teaching statistics (sponsored by DART-P)

Emma McDonald, Division of Academics, Researchers and Teachers in Psychology (DART-P, BPS)

Teaching research methods and statistics is at the core of all pre-tertiary courses. After all, how do you make sense of core studies within a specification if the students don’t understand how the data was gathered and analysed?

However, it is often considered a thankless task by many teachers, who find themselves confronting hard-wired, negative attitudes shown by many students towards what is often perceived as the ‘dryer side’ of psychology’. But is it possible to make the topic more pleasurable for both staff and students while improving theoretical understanding? In this workshop we discuss different methods that we have utilised in Higher Education to improve the experience of both teaching and learning statistics and research methods, in particular the use of colourful examples and student-led seminars. I will discuss the insights from the students regarding what they think about the methods used and go on to evaluate which methods have stood the test of time and contributed in their understanding and application of statistics for psychology. We will consider how these methods can be transferred into a pre-tertiary context.

43   Applying for QTLS: Life beyond FE

Helen Kitching, CPsychol, AFBPsS, Msc, QTLS

If you are thinking of looking for work in a school you must have Qualified Teacher Status or the FE equivalent (by law), QTLS. If you are needing to apply for this, come along for some help, support and advice for how to make it as painless as possible (can’t do anything about the exorbitant cost of applying though – sorry).

44   What is human?

Harriet Ennis, Bootham School

A revitalising, interactive workshop with some take-away resources to stimulate your students. What do football fans, babies watching puppet shows, chimpanzees and the Malteaser challenge tell us about ourselves? The human is a sentient being capable of meta-cognition (we think about our thinking). Surely, Psychology is the ultimate in evidence-based meta-cognition. Indeed Psychology can reveal how to make the most of our special brain. Why is Homo sapiens the only hominin to survive? Evidence that the brain is primed at birth for morality, selflessness and co-operation (aside from bigotry and war) points to what ‘gave us the edge’. This session explores Evolutionary Psychology and how to get your students primed for collaborative learning – the sort of learning that gains them higher grades.

 

 

 

45 Sunflowers, Sanity and Psych teachers

Punam Farmah, FoundationonCampus, Coventry

Teaching is arguably one of the most stressful professions. Driven to plan, prepare and assess, we all juggle the demands of work and our ‘real’ lives. So we do need something to stay sane. Allotmenteering and gardening have long since been touted as strategies to improve health and wellbeing. Raising questions as to whether teachers can learn lessons to work safer, smarter and not necessarily harder. Sowing a seed, nurturing it and seeing it grow could be a strategy to help answer that question. You get fresh air, exercise, and let your mind wander without thinking about AfL success criteria and levels of progress. Students too can reap the rewards, as school and colleges up and down the country use horticulture to support some of their most vulnerable learners. EcoSchools and Colleges of budding greenfingered gardeners are seeing a positive effect on their learners and their educators. Whether it be a window box in your kitchen, or pots on your patio. Sinking a sunflower, might make for a saner Psychology teacher. In this workshop we consider the evidence for using gardening for positive health and well being. As well as how we might use it ourselves. Plus, an opportunity to get your hands dirty and sow some sunflowers to take away with you.

46 Edexcel 2015: Towards an evaluative, applied and creative curriculum

Amanda Wood, Portsmouth Grammar School

Having taught Edexcel for the best part of 15 years, we felt that “if it ain’t broke why fix it?” and decided to stay loyal to our board. Finally, with the spec accredited, new sample assessment questions released and sample chapters tempting us to think we might actually have some textbooks by September, the job of remodelling the scheme of work starts in earnest. Over the past few exam seasons we have seen Edexcel moving towards far more applied questions, nuanced and specific evaluation and the requirement for our pupils to genuinely understand ‘how psychology works’, think like a psychologist and design their own simple studies under exam conditions. It seems that perhaps this was a prophecy of what was to come as the sample assessment questions certainly seem rather different to what we have seen before. This session will focus on using classroom time to focus less on content and more on skills, providing a range of practical activities to

  • foster extended evaluation, e.g. ‘research rainbows’, ‘building a tower of support’, constructing ‘rafts of empirical evidence’ and ‘paper-chains of reason’
  • facilitate the application of concepts, theories and studies in “extract” questions, e.g. developing confidence with unseen material including data
  • encourage pupils to take a scientific approach to exploring “real word stories” through the creation of simple studies

I hope that it will be an interesting a useful session where we can share our thoughts about how to approach the new Edexcel curriculum and equip our pupils to continue to score big in exams, develop their love of psychology and be even better prepared for psychology in HE.

47   The appropriate or maybe inappropriate use of ‘sex’ and other video ‘clips’ when teaching psychology

Andy McCarthy CPsychol. Christ Church University and amac-education

WARNING this session is not for the faint hearted or those easily offended!!! However in class, just mention the word ‘sex’ and you have all the student’s full attention. This workshop will explore ways of introducing sex and humour into the classroom as a ‘learning tool’ and will include: Lap dancing, Blonde Girl Jokes, Fifty Shades of Grey, Harry Potter and others.

On a more serious note, we will also look at some contemporary issues raised by: The McDonalds ‘Strip Hoax’, Le Jeu de Mort (Game of Death… French reality TV) and research which suggests that maybe Zimbardo and Asch both got it all totally wrong!

The session will end with input from you. I will add your ideas to my file and make everything available after conference via Dropbox™ or similar.

Book early, as this will probably be the best ‘breakout’ session at conference!

48     Is there a criminal brain?

Dr Guy Sutton, Director, Medical Biology Interactive & Honorary (Consultant) Assistant Professor, in the Division of Psychiatry at University of Nottingham.

Is there a biological basis to criminality? In this lecture, we will move beyond traditional theories of chromosome abnormality and hormonal influences to address, for example, modern theories of the neural basis of neural decision making, brain circuits and behavioural regulation, and perinatal and postnatal influences on epigenetic regulation in the brain. Important issues such as the use of neuroscientific evidence in courts will also be considered.

49    Explicit and implicit measures used in the study of prejudice

Dr Neil McLatchie, University of Lancaster

This workshop will provide information on two measures commonly used by psychologists to study prejudice. Attendees will complete a measure of both explicit prejudice and implicit prejudice. The explicit measure emphasises the need to consider a multi-dimensional approach to studying prejudice; while participants might show negative bias when judging a group based on certain traits (e.g. warmth), the same participants might show positive bias when judging the same group along other traits (e.g. sociability). Attendees will also complete the Implicit Association Task, which is commonly used to measure automatic, unconscious prejudice. The session will include a discussion of the results and their implications.

50  Mathematical requirements in the New Specifications for September 2015 (repeat)

Deb Gajic, The Polesworth School

Deb is head of Psychology at The Polesworth School (an ‘outstanding’ school, where Deb is an ‘outstanding teacher’!) and a Chartered Psychologist. She has been a member of the ATP committee for many years and her latest role is Treasurer, previously having held the posts of Magazine Editor and Chair. She is passionate about teaching and regularly runs training workshops for teachers of Psychology, recently for Keynote Educational and the Higher Education Academy.

 

Within the new 2015 A level Psychology specifications 10% of the marks available will be for assessment of mathematics (in the context of psychology) at a Level 2 standard or higher. Lower level mathematics may still be assessed, but will not count towards the 10%. This new requirement is a concern for many teachers; either because they are worried about how to support lower level students or not confident about their own subject knowledge in this area. This workshop aims to demystify maths, change negative mindsets and provide practical and fun ways to teach this in the context of Psychology.

51   OCR Component 3 Applied psychology – Issues in mental health and Applied Psychology options (repeat)

Jock McGinty

This workshop will look at the background, key research and how it’s applied to a novel situation. Jock will also address the methodological issues and debates that run throughout Applied Psychology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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